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PRBA Statement on the UAE General Civil Aviation Authority Report on the 2010 UPS Aircraft Accident

PRBA–The Rechargeable Battery Association  commends the General Civil Aviation Authority (GCAA) of the United Arab Emirates for the release of a comprehensive report detailing its thorough investigation into the 2010 cargo plane accident near Dubai.

The report states that some of the lithium batteries shipped as cargo on the aircraft were neither properly packaged and labeled nor declared as dangerous goods. Some batteries also failed to comply with the mandatory testing requirements in the United Nations Manual of Tests and Criteria, the report added.

The safe transport of lithium batteries is PRBA’s number one priority. Compliance with the international dangerous goods transport regulations is the key to the safe transport of lithium batteries. PRBA has repeatedly expressed its concerns regarding non-compliant shipments of lithium batteries in certain parts of the world and urged enforcement agencies to aggressively use their authority to stop non-compliant shippers of lithium batteries from offering their batteries for transport.

PRBA supports the GCAA’s recommendation that the U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration harmonize its lithium battery safety regulations with those already in effect under the ICAO Technical Instructions for the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods by Air.

PRBA looks forward to working with the airline industry and dangerous goods regulatory authorities to address the safety issues and recommendations in the GCAA report.

Please attribute the above statements to PRBA Executive Director George Kerchner. 

UAE Final Report – UPS Boeing 747-44AF – N571UP

Air Accident Investigation Report.

Download Report

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